“I didn’t feel like reading the help document you sent me, so I figured I would call and have you walk me through it.”
— (via clientsfromhell)

hiromutsuboi:

ORIGINAL PATTERN 119   © Hiromu Tsuboi / www.gr2inc.com

creativemornings:

"Don’t start with the local immediate thing around you, start with the vision of where you want to go. Set the ambition at the outset."

— Paddy Harrington. Watch the talk.

adteachings:

Agency: Leo BurnettAdvertiser: Procter & Gamble - BounceTitle: Shirt/Pants/DressNewspaper(s): Metro | 24 HoursCreative Director: Judy JohnArt Director: Paul GiannettaCopywriter: Chris TaciukMedia Planning: Starcom MediaVestChief Creative Officer: Judy John Group Creative Director: Paul Giannetta & Chris TaciukIllustrator: Nabil Elsaadi Producer: Anne Peck Account Director: Allison Litzinger Assistant Account Executive: Elizabeth Rivers
adteachings:

Agency: Leo BurnettAdvertiser: Procter & Gamble - BounceTitle: Shirt/Pants/DressNewspaper(s): Metro | 24 HoursCreative Director: Judy JohnArt Director: Paul GiannettaCopywriter: Chris TaciukMedia Planning: Starcom MediaVestChief Creative Officer: Judy John Group Creative Director: Paul Giannetta & Chris TaciukIllustrator: Nabil Elsaadi Producer: Anne Peck Account Director: Allison Litzinger Assistant Account Executive: Elizabeth Rivers
adteachings:

Agency: Leo BurnettAdvertiser: Procter & Gamble - BounceTitle: Shirt/Pants/DressNewspaper(s): Metro | 24 HoursCreative Director: Judy JohnArt Director: Paul GiannettaCopywriter: Chris TaciukMedia Planning: Starcom MediaVestChief Creative Officer: Judy John Group Creative Director: Paul Giannetta & Chris TaciukIllustrator: Nabil Elsaadi Producer: Anne Peck Account Director: Allison Litzinger Assistant Account Executive: Elizabeth Rivers

adteachings:

Agency: Leo Burnett
Advertiser: Procter & Gamble - Bounce
Title: Shirt/Pants/Dress
Newspaper(s): Metro | 24 Hours
Creative Director: Judy John
Art Director: Paul Giannetta
Copywriter: Chris Taciuk
Media Planning: Starcom MediaVest
Chief Creative Officer: Judy John
Group Creative Director: Paul Giannetta & Chris Taciuk
Illustrator: Nabil Elsaadi
Producer: Anne Peck
Account Director: Allison Litzinger
Assistant Account Executive: Elizabeth Rivers

npr:

NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey explains a surprising new finding on the connection between fish consumption and hearing for our Snapchat Fact of the Day. If you aren’t already following us, add us at “nprnews.” We post an interesting fact from a reporter every day.

And make sure to read Allison’s full story on our Shots blog.

itscolossal:

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang
itscolossal:

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang
itscolossal:

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang
itscolossal:

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang
itscolossal:

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang
itscolossal:

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang

nbcparksandrec:

The permit to end all permits.

oupacademic:

New York Fashion Week for Spring/Summer 2015 has come to an end, but you can still access Berg Fashion Library freely for another week.

Berg Fashion Library is a unique resource for students and scholars of fashion and dress, with a diverse range of content from anthropology, art history, sociology, fashion, and textiles, and more.

Use the login details below for free access to Berg Fashion Library for the next two weeks:
Username: gratisuser109
Password: onlineaccess109

Fashion Drawing: Paquin evening dress © Fashion Museum, Bath and North East Somerset Council. Courtesy of Berg Fashion Library. Do not use without permission.

fastcompany:

Fast Company’s “Letter From The Editor,” June 2007

"We’ve just moved to 7 World Trade Center, a site destroyed on 9/11 and rebuilt as one of the first gold-level green-certified office buildings in New York. We overlook the Hudson River and Wall Street— and the pit where the Twin Towers once stood. I can see their footprint from my desk.

This is my first letter to readers as editor of this magazine, and my second issue. I didn’t choose our new site, but I’m proud of it, proud of our owner and our CEO for having the faith and the foresight to embrace this venue as one of possibility in the wake of tragedy. Not everyone is thrilled about the real estate we now occupy. My wife was anxious when I first told her about our new address, reminded of that terrible day in 2001. Some staffers at our company chose not to move with us; the memories were too harsh. But I feel differently. For a magazine like Fast Company, there is no more fitting location for our headquarters: a place that is all about rebirth and potential and the promise of tomorrow.” — Robert Safian, Editor (Photo by iamrobbiejones
)

Ahhhh, yes.
ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.
The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.
The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections: 91.1.1402, 17.194.157 & 17.194.253. ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.
The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.
The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections: 91.1.1402, 17.194.157 & 17.194.253. ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.
The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.
The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections: 91.1.1402, 17.194.157 & 17.194.253.

ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.

The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.

The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections91.1.140217.194.157 & 17.194.253.